Return to Dalbeattie Domain Server
Return to Saga Hotel, Poros
Jenny on the Areopagus, Athens, Greece

Poros 2007 -
Our September Fortnight in Greece

~ Index & Homepage ~ Greek & English Names ~
~ Holiday Blog : 12th ~ 13th ~ 14th ~ 15th ~ 16th ~ 17th ~ 18th ~
~ 19th ~ 20th ~ 21st ~ 22nd ~ 23rd ~ 24th ~ 25th ~ 26th ~ 27th ~


~ History of Poros & Trizina Area and Historic Sites in Central Greece ~
~ Poros Index : Businesses, Tavernas and Useful Information ~
~ Site Sources ~ Links ~ Poros 2006 Blog ~ 2006 & 2007 Blog Updates ~
~ Saga Hotel, Poros ~


Love Bay, Dennis's Gift and the Airport Museum -
26th September 2007


  • A Last Visit to Love Bay
  • Dennis's Gift to Jenny.
  • Ferry to Piraeus.
  • A Relaxed Attitude on the Bus.
  • Athens Airport Museum.
  • Off to Glasgow.

Dennis's Gift - Jenny and Her Jennies
Dennis's Gift - Jenny and Her Jennies

© 2007 Dennis McCallum. All rights reserved.
Website : http://www.wildlife-art-uk.co.uk

A Last Visit to Love Bay :

Jenny had made up her mind to get all she could out of the holiday, so when dawn came fine and clear, she resolved to make a lazy morning visit to Love Bay. The lad with the computer had decided to resolve his problems by ditching one program and buying another, but he took our 6.50 Euros for Sofianna and we settled down on our sunbeds under a parasol. I must say that it was warm and comfortable in the shelter of Love Bay, neither of us wanting to leave this pleasant spot. Jen had put on top and shorts over her bikini, but eventually it was bright and warm enough for her to sunbathe, even - greatly daring - to bob down into the sea, but she won't let me show that pic. I did get some lovely shots of Jen on her sunbed at Love Bay, but at length it was time to regretfully pack up and head 'home' to the Hotel for the last time this year.

Jenny Sunning at Love Bay
Jenny Sunning at Love Bay
Diana and Our Barman
Diana and Our Barman
Farewell to The Gang
Farewell to The Gang

Dennis's Gift to Jenny ...

We had already packed most things up, but had some decisions to make with the toiletries and so on, which could have been a weight penalty, so Jenny decided that we would leave it, neatly arranged, for the staff or the next user (the maid got it, Frances later told me). Frances and Dennis had already turned up to wish us well, also up were our bunch of new friends, including Sue and the inimitable Diana. They were all sad to see us go, which was rather nice, but the real stunner came when Dennis handed us a carboard envelope; it was a print of that remarkable Wren picture that he had been painting - 'Jenny and her Jennies' - which Jenny packed carefully in the bottom of her case. The picture now graces the wall of our bedroom above Jen's dressing-table. Once we were packed and out of the room, there was still a bit of time before the taxi was due; we used it in chatting and I took a few more pictures. All too soon, the taxi arrived to whisk us off to the ferry landing, where we found ourselves (due to my caution) with a bit more time to kill. So into the Baltsera for a final hot chocolate (me) and a coffee (Jen). Ironically, although this day and the two before had been cool, within two days the temperature had switched back to the heat we had faced in our first ten days.

Major irony whilst leaving. In her book 'Coming Slowly', local expatriate, Anna Ibbotson, spoke of her time as guide aboard the 'Anna II'. Frances told us that the charter boat had not been around this year. Well, the sister ship 'Anna' was alost the last new thing we saw before the Flying Dolphin roared in from Hydra...Now, ain't that somethin' ?

Frances, Jenny and Dennis
Frances, Jenny and Dennis
The 'Anna' near Galatas
The 'Anna' near Galatas
Flying Dolphin XVII
Flying Dolphin XVII

Ferry to Piraeus ...

The Flying Dolphin XVII arrived on time and scudded northwards across a slightly choppy sea to Piraeus. I took a few parting pictures of Methana and Salamis, before we arrived at sunset and about 7 pm. Fairly desperate by then for the toilet and a drink, we pulled our cases across to Frances's suggested restaurant, finding that the facilities were less well serviced than the appearances promised. However, the drinks and a bun were acceptable, then we had to settle an argument as to where the X96 would stop. After discovering that the old point by Gate E8 had been abandoned, we tried the adjacent bus lanes round the corner from the Filoxenia, before correctly recalling the brazen mustachioed rider on his horse and going over to the kiosk opposite the Blue Star and Lanes Line buildings. Others wanting the Airport came soon afterwards, and it was with mild relief that we validated our tickets in the orange box and sat within reach of our cases.

Salamis from Dolphin
Salamis from Dolphin
Blue Star and Lane Lines
Blue Star and Lane Lines
Museum 'Bridge' above Concourse
Museum 'Bridge' above Concourse

A Relaxed Attitude on the Bus...

The ride back to Eleftherios Venizelios Airport had its frustrations, for I was unable to identify the signs for the Battleship Averoff and the Nautical Museum. However, it was a good example of the Greek laid-back approach; at one stop, an attractive girl got on, flirted with the driver, then was let off at her stop. Another time, a crony of the driver got on, briefly got off at a stop to get smokes, then carried on to his stop. Despite these interludes, the driver managed to keep to his schedule, a lesson maybe for the disciplinarians amongst British bus inspectors. Yet again, the Protestant Work Ethic received an uncomfortable knock; Greeks work hard for their family obligations, but maybe refuse to knock themselves apart for The Job.

Athens Airport Museum ...

Faced by a long wait till the check-in time, Jen and myself found a pair of seats near the shops, she reading and me writing, with a few snacks to keep us going. At one time Jen went for almost half an hour to stretch her legs, leaving me to watch the arrival of eight members of a Greek family. Sadly, there seemed a lot of black amongst the women, so I guessed there might have been a relatively recent death aongst their relatives. Had I been able to speak some Greek, I might have spoken to them, but without even a phrasebook, I could only sit and watch. They had brought half-baguette meat salad sandwiches and bottles of soft drinks, consumed neatly and with enjoyment; envious, I later searched for something to eat, once Jenny returned, as I did not feel that I could wait much longer.

Jenny had discovered something remarkable in the main concourse, up at the top of a pair of escalators leading to a pedestrian 'bridge'; there was an enormous 'pithoi' or storage jar, with beyond it the entrance to a small free museum. It seems that the archaeologists excavated a range of sites during the relatively recent construction of the airport. The range is impressive, from 3,200 BC to the late mediaeval period and the Turkish Occupation. Temples, burial grounds, farms, country houses, defensive towers, small Roman-age settlements, potters' kilns and workshops, roads and wells, even the remains of a church dedicated to Aghios Petros (St. Peter). The infrastructure and finds of an agricultural society gradually evolving over nearly 5,000 years, ending with the ultra-modern main airport of Greece. I reflected that I had come to Greece in search of its history, only to miss one of the nicest introductions until a couple of hours before I was due to leave. Yet there was more to look at.

Pithoi by Airport Museum
Pithoi by Airport Museum
Country Crossroads, Classical Athens
Country Crossroads, Classical Athens
Museum Display
Museum Display

Eleftherios Venizelios was a politician and an entrepreneur, the kind of man other Greeks seem to have liked and loathed in equal measure. A summary of his life was to the left of the museum display, further along the pedestrian 'bridge' and with a fine bronze bust of the man as its main feature. The link with the airport is that Venizelios had originated one of the first Greek airlines, in keeping with a man who had been a supporter of the 'Great Idea' of a restored Empire of the Hellenes. I was left to wonder at this remarkable juxtaposition of the two Greeces - ancient and modern - before I left for Jenny and the check-in desks. Whoever did that display did one of the best presentation jobs that I had seen in Greece.

After the Museum, check-in and the subsequent travelator journey to the Terminal Island seemed a bit of an anti-climax; Jenny was unhappy at having to leave Greece, as was I, and the departure lounge's stainless steel seemed as grim as a submarine. It was almost a relief when we were allowed to go to the boarding point, then through the 'elephant's trunk' to the plane. This time, our seats were behind the wing on the starboard side, which gave me unjustified worries about noise - modern turbofans are quite quiet. Then the aircraft backed out a few minutes after midnight and we were on our way down the taxiways to the runway and home.

Archaeological Map of Airport
Archaeological Map of Airport
Bust of Eleftherios Venizelios
Bust of Eleftherios Venizelios

Top

© 2007 and 2008 Richard Edkins, Dalbeattie Internet.